Curriculum

Bible

Bible I

Jesus said, “If anyone wants to be my disciple: he must deny himself, take up his cross daily, and follow after me.” A disciple is simply a “learner” and a “follower” of Jesus. It doesn’t mean that one knows everything there is to know about Jesus and his teachings, but it does mean that a student is accountable for even the little bit that he does know. Being a disciple of Jesus is a life-long commitment and so the goal of Bible I is to introduce the students to what it means to be a follower of Christ.

Bible II

Bible II is a survey of the biblical story in its progressive unfolding of the history of redemption against the backdrop of creation and sin. Attention is given to the literary, historical, cultural, and theological dimensions of Scripture. Emphasis is placed on the unity of the Bible as it reaches its fullness and fulfillment in Christ.

Bible III

The overall goal of this course is to discover what the scriptures, as a whole, teach about specific subjects. These teachings are called doctrines. So, when we study the doctrine of the church, for instance, we are asking what the whole Bible says about the church—a daunting task, no doubt. In this course students will be asked what the entire Bible teaches us about God, mankind, sin, salvation, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Christian living, the church, angels, Satan, future events, hell and Heaven.

Bible IV

The primary focus of Bible IV is apologetics, for students to know why they believe what they believe. This course defines worldview, explores the history of Scripture so that students can have an even greater confidence that the Bible truly is the inspired, inerrant, and authoritative Word of God, contrasts prominent world religions against the truth claims of Christianity, and discusses current cultural issues from a biblical perspective. 

Foreign Languages

French I

French I will explore the French language with emphasis in speaking, listening, writing, reading, and culture. The student will begin to develop grammar and linguistic proficiency as well as cultural sensitivity. By interweaving language and culture, this class will broaden the students’ communication skills while simultaneously deepening their appreciation of other cultures. Language is an important tool in communicating the Gospel and this course will be taught with a Christian worldview based on Matthew 28:19. "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

French II

French II will build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in French I by further exploring the French language.  There will be emphasis in speaking, listening, writing, reading, and culture. The student will continue to develop linguistic and grammatical proficiency as well as cultural sensitivity. By interweaving language and culture, this class will broaden the students’ communication skills while simultaneously deepening their appreciation of other cultures. Language is an important tool in communicating the Gospel and this course will be taught with a Christian worldview based on Matthew 28:19. "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

French III

French III will build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in French I & II by further exploring the French language. There will be continued emphasis in speaking, listening, writing, reading, and culture. The student will continue to develop linguistic and grammatical proficiency as well as cultural sensitivity. By interweaving language and culture, this class will broaden the students’ communication skills while simultaneously deepening their appreciation of other cultures. There will be specific focus on the regions of France and francophone nations around the world. Language is an important tool in communicating the Gospel and this course will be taught with a Christian worldview based on Matthew 28:19. "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

French IV

French IV will further explore the French language through the  emphasis of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and culture.  The student will review and enhance what was established in French I, II, & III to mature linguistic and grammatical proficiency as well as cultural sensitivity.  By interweaving language and culture, this class will broaden the students’ communication skills while simultaneously deepening their appreciation of other cultures.  Language is an important tool in communicating the Gospel and this course will be taught with a Christian worldview based on Matthew 28:19. "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

Spanish I

The overall goal of Spanish I is to introduce basic Spanish vocabulary and structures in order to strengthen self-expression and basic communication skills in functional contexts. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are developed through the introduction of vocabulary and linguistic structures. Communication is made relevant to students by using youth-related themes and by personalizing content. Cultural themes are also interwoven in each chapter. There is emphasis on oral proficiency and spontaneous use of the language through communicative activities and situational dialogues. Active participation, success, and satisfaction in using the language are major goals.

Spanish II

The overall goal of Spanish II is to review and dig deeper into basic Spanish vocabulary and structures in order to strengthen self-expression and basic communication skills in functional contexts. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are further developed through expanded application of vocabulary and linguistic structures. Communication is made relevant to students by using youth-related themes and by personalizing content. Cultural themes are interwoven into each chapter. There is continued emphasis on oral proficiency, and increased stress on spontaneous use of the language through communicative activities and situational dialogues. Active participation, success, and satisfaction in using the language are major goals.

Spanish III

The overall goal of Spanish III is to help students expand their Spanish skills, particularly in the areasof  reading longer stories, creative and response-style writing, listening practice, and conversational speaking.  In order to learn a language, students must be exposed to the language regularly, and immersion is the best learning tool.   Students will be immersed in the language each class.  However, students must also contribute to that immersion by speaking the language as much as possible in an effort to improve fluency. Expanding language skills outside of high school can open a plethora of opportunities.

Language Arts

English (9th Grade)

The 9th grade English course introduces and exposes the individual student to several genres in literature including poetry, drama, the short story, and novel. Students will read, discuss, and write, focusing on the importance of learning effective communication skills since we have been commissioned “to be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope you have” (I Peter 3:15). A heavy emphasis will be placed on the analysis of literature through written expression; skills such as outlining, drafting and editing will be developed through numerous paragraph, essay, and five- paragraph essay assignments. Prayerfully, the students will grow in their ability to discern God’s truth in what they read and in their ability to communicate His truth to the world around them as they are exposed to literature that will enable them to develop a deeper understanding of the Word.

Honors English (9th Grade)

The 9th grade Honors English course is designed to place a heavy emphasis on critical, independent reading and the analysis of literature through composition. While students are enrolled in the English I Honors course, they will read, evaluate, form thesis statements, and write responses to various types of literature using the MLA (Modern Language Association) documentation style. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Eight Grade English, to qualify for this course.

CP World Literature (10th grade)

CP World Literature is designed to strengthen critical thinking and writing skills through the study of both Western and non-Western literary traditions. Textual study will include analysis of significant works of drama, poetry, short stories and novels from North America, Europe, Africa and Asia and the universal human concerns. Students will produce written responses to texts according to MLA guidelines in which they incorporate use of advanced vocabulary, language, and grammatical structure in preparation for future ACT, SAT, and college testing.

Honors World Literature (10th Grade)

Honors World Literature (ENG II) is designed to strengthen critical thinking and writing skills through the study of both Western and non-Western literary traditions. Textual study will include analysis of significant works of drama, poetry, short stories and novels from North America, Europe, Africa and Asia and the human concerns that we, as Christians, are called to address. Students will produce written responses to texts according to MLA guidelines in which they incorporate analysis and skillful use of language to prepare them for future ACT, SAT, and college testing. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Ninth Grade English, to qualify for this course.

CP American Literature (11th Grade)

This course is a survey of American literature from the early stages of U.S. history to the present. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, analysis, and written evaluations of the readings. Students will assess prose writing by examining an author’s use of diction, syntax, tone, structure, purpose, and meaning. In addition to different genres of literature read during class, students are encouraged and expected to read independently while taking part in various assigned reading activities and projects. Students are also challenged to write articulately and creatively using various forms of writing such as short stories, essays, reflections, and a research paper. Grammar skills are reviewed, as needed, while integrated with the class’s writing and speaking activities. Vocabulary enrichment will connect to the literary works studied and also be emphasized by a supplemental vocabulary program. Critical and independent thinking skills are a daily part of the curriculum.

AP English Language and Composition (11th or 12th grade)

The purpose of this course is to help students “write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives” (The College Board AP English Course Description, May 2007, May 2008, p.6). The course is organized according to the requirements and guidelines of the current AP English Course Description, and, therefore, students are expected to read critically, think analytically, and communicate clearly. Students in this introductory college-level course read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works. Through close reading and frequent informal and formal writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their own composition abilities. Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts within but not limited to the following literary forms: short story, novel, essay, letter, speech/sermon, images, and poetry. Students will use the writing process to compose analytical writing addressing different rhetorical modes. Additionally, students will learn how to examine and critique external sources to synthesize thesis based research. Students prepare for the AP English Language and Composition Exam and may be granted advanced placement, college credit, or both as a result of satisfactory performance. The course is constructed in accordance with the guidelines described in the AP English Course Description. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, World Literature, to qualify for this course.

CP British Literature (12th grade)

This course is a survey of outstanding works of British literature. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, analysis, synthesis, and written evaluation of the readings. Students will assess prose and poetry by examining an author’s use of diction, syntax, tone, structure, purpose, and meaning. In addition to the different genres of literature read during class, students are encouraged and expected to read independently while taking part in the assigned reading and writing activities. Students are challenged to write articulately and creatively using various forms of writing such as short stories, essays, poetry, and research reports. Grammar skills are reviewed, as needed, while integrated with the class’s writing and speaking activities. Vocabulary enrichment will connect to the literary works studied and also be emphasized by a supplemental vocabulary program. Critical and independent thinking skills are a daily part of the class’s curriculum.

College English 101 (Dual Enrollment – 1 semester)

In this course students will focus on informational, analytical, and argumentative writing (the principal genres of academic discourse that students will encounter across the college curriculum) and on research and critical thinking. Students will examine the principals of effective communication and become familiar with the principals of academic writing through the analysis of non-fiction texts, written and visual. Students will write a minimum of three papers through the semester and create a final portfolio that showcases their development as writers throughout the course. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in one of the following prerequisite courses, American Literature (or) AP English Language and Composition, to qualify for this course.

College English 102 (Dual Enrollment – 1 semester)

In this course students will continue to build on the written and spoken communication skills developed in English 101. Students will focus on analytical and argumentative writing (the principle genres of academic discourse that students will encounter in the college curriculum) and on research and critical thinking. Students will examine literary genres to increase cultural awareness and continue to develop their familiarity with academic writing. Students will write a minimum of three papers through the semester and create a final portfolio that showcases their development as writers throughout the course. The prerequisite for College English 102 is College English 101 (or) a score of “3” or “4” on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

College English 202 British Literature (Dual Enrollment – 1 semester)

A survey of representative selections of British literature, English 202 covers works from the Victorian Period to the emergence of the Modern Era in the early 1900’s. Emphasis is on reading, in historical context, selected works by major authors and critical analysis of such works in the form of expository prose essays, a research paper, and prepared discussion. The prerequisite for College English 202 is College English 102.

Mathematics

CP Algebra I

The overall goal of this course is to build a foundation for higher math classes. Algebra I will introduce the student to variables, algebraic expressions, equations, functions, inequalities, and their graphical representation. The student will develop the ability to: explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and communicate mathematical ideas clearly.

CP Geometry

The overall goal of this course is to develop reasoning and problem solving skills. The student will develop reasoning and problem solving skills by studying such topics as congruence and similarity, and applying properties of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles. The prerequisite course for Geometry is Algebra I.

Honors Geometry

This course will cover the same content in CP Geometry except students will cover it more rapidly and in greater depth providing a more academically rigorous experience for those students with higher ability and aptitude levels in math. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Algebra I, to qualify for this course.

CP Algebra II

The content of Algebra II is organized around families of functions, including linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions. As students study each family of functions, they will learn to represent them in multiple ways – as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. Students will also learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations. The prerequisite course for CP Algebra II is Geometry.

Honors Algebra II

This course will cover the same content as CP Algebra II plus students will learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations. This honors course will cover material more rapidly and in greater depth providing a more academically rigorous experience for those students with higher ability and aptitude levels in math. One of the main goals for this course is to prepare students for Pre-Calculus (College Algebra [Dual 102] / Trigonometry). Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Geometry, to qualify for this course.

Algebra III

This course is designed to continue the students’ study of Algebra and prepare them to take the college placement exam for mathematics.  While many concepts will be familiar to the student from their previous studies in Algebra, many problems will be looked at in the context of real-life situations.  The student will also study examples from multiple perspectives—algebraically, graphically, and numerically.   One of the main goals is to foster mathematical understanding of the problems presented.   

College Algebra 102 (Dual Enrollment – 1 semester)

This is college level course in algebra. The course presents many problems from multiple perspectives—algebraically, graphically, and numerically, and also in the context of real-life situations. The student will receive one high school credit and three college credit hours from Truett-McConnell College upon successful completion of this semester long course. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Algebra II, to qualify for this course.

Honors Trigonometry (1 semester)

(Pre-requisites MA 102).

This course is designed to continue the student’s study of triangles and angles and to prepare them for MA 191, MA 211 and/or AP Calculus.  Topics covered include trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, solving trigonometric equations, and applications and models.  An introduction to Calculus will be covered if time permits. 

AP Calculus

The Content of AP Calculus focuses on preparing students for the AP exam. Students will study limits, continuity, derivatives, rates of change, slopes of curves, velocity, acceleration, definite and indefinite integrals, finding functions from rates of change, area of regions between curves, volumes of solids of revolution. Student will learn about each of these concepts from a graphical, numerical, analytical, and verbal perspective. The prerequisite courses for AP Calculus are College Algebra 102 and Trigonometry.

Dual Enrollment MA 101 - Math Modeling (1 semester)

This course is an Introduction to Mathematical Modeling based on the use of elementary functions to describe and explore real world phenomena.  Content includes descriptive statistics and mathematical modeling using graphical and algebraic techniques. Emphasis is on applications and the ability to construct useful mathematical models, to analyze them critically, and to communicate quantitative concepts effectively. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours from Truett McConnell College.   

Dual Enrollment MA 102 - College Algebra (1 Semester)

(Pre-requisites grade of 88 or above in Honors Algebra 2, or P.O.D.).   

This course is designed as an entry level college algebra course.  While many concepts from Algebra will be familiar to the student, the course presents many problems from multiple perspectives—algebraically, graphically, and numerically, and also in the context of real-life situations.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours from Truett McConnell College.   

Dual Enrollment MA 191 Pre-Calculus (1 Semester)

 (Pre-requisites MA 102, Honors Trigonometry). 

This course delves deeper into college algebra topics such as solving equations, graphing and analyzing a variety of functions, including linear, quadratic, rational, exponential and logarithmic, identifying and expanding sequences and series, right-triangle trigonometry, graphing of trigonometric functions, and using trigonometric identities in proofs and computations.  Emphasis is placed on the aspects of these topics that are foundational for calculus, including end behavior and rates of change.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours from Point University. 

Dual Enrollment MA  200 -  Elementary Statistics (1 Semester)

(Pre-requisites MA 102).

The purpose of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of the big ideas of statistics and of the methods used in solving statistical problems.  Data is analyzed and presented using graphs and numerical summaries.  Topics covered include measures of central tendency, methods of data collection, density curves, distributions, and probability.  The course operates under the premise that a student learns statistics best by doing statistical problems.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours from Truett McConnell College.   ​

Dual Enrollment MA 211 - Calculus (1 Semester)

(Pre-requisites MA 102, Honors Trigonometry, MA 191). 

This course is a study of limits and derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of differentiation, integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. At the conclusion of this course students should be able to: intuitively understand the concept of limits, calculate limits using algebra, understand continuity in terms of limits, understand the concept of the derivative, calculate derivatives graphically and algebraically, describe the relationships between the graphs of  f, f’, f’’, model real-life optimization problems, model rates of change - including related rates problems, define the definite integral as a limit of Riemann sums, compute values of definite integrals, model real-life problems using definite integrals.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours from Point University.    

Science

CP Biology

This course provides a unique opportunity to explore the intricacies of God’s creation, from the smallest, microscopic cell to the wonderfully complex systems that exist on a larger, global scale. The goal for this course is for students to understand the broader concepts in biology and to apply their knowledge to real world situations. Throughout this course, students will use the scientific method as they conduct experiments and other activities to investigate biological organisms. All the information in this course will be taught from the Christian’s worldview with God as the Creator.

Honors Biology

This course will cover the same content in CP Biology except students will cover it more rapidly and in greater depth providing a more academically rigorous experience for those students with higher ability and aptitude levels in science. Inquiry based labs will be performed to allow students to apply their knowledge of biological concepts and to develop critical thinking skills. All the information in this course will be taught from the Christian’s worldview with God as the Creator. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Eighth Grade Science, to qualify for this course.

CP Environmental Science

Environmental Science is a course that serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and environmental studies. Throughout this course students will cover a wide variety of material including ecology, populations, minerals and energy resources, and our human impact on the future of the environment. The information in this course will be taught from a Christian’s worldview taking note how God’s word and science support each other.

CP Physical Science

Physical Science is a survey of physics and chemistry. Topics that will be covered include: motion, forces, energy, heat, waves (sound and light), electricity, magnetism, properties of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, and radioactive decay. Throughout the course students will learn about real life applications of physics and chemistry and practice science process and lab skills. The information in this course will be taught from a Christian’s worldview taking note how God’s word and science support each other.

CP Chemistry

In this course, students will see how scientific discovery in chemistry is verifying the truth of God’s word. Students will cover properties of matter, measurement and calculations, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical formulas, chemical reactions, chemical equations, stoichiometry (calculating the amounts of substances in a reaction), kinetic theory, gas laws, properties of solutions, acids and bases, reaction energy, chemical equilibrium, nuclear chemistry, and basic organic compounds. In addition, students will learn about real life applications of chemistry, from household chemicals to fuels and propellants, nuclear energy, environmental protection, human physiology, and understanding the universe as a whole. Through inquiry based labs students will practice science processes and expand their critical thinking skills.

Honors Chemistry

In this course, we will see how scientific discovery in chemistry is verifying the truth of God’s word. The Honors Chemistry course will cover topics more deeply than the CP Chemistry course. We will study properties of matter, measurement and calculations, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical formulas, chemical reactions, chemical equations, stoichiometry (calculating the amounts of substances in a reaction), kinetic theory, gas laws, properties of solutions, acids and bases, reaction energy, chemical equilibrium, nuclear chemistry, and basic organic compounds. We will learn about real life applications of chemistry, from household chemicals to fuels and propellants, nuclear energy, environmental protection, human physiology, and understanding the universe as a whole. Through inquiry based labs we will practice science process and critical thinking skills.

AP Chemistry

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a comprehensive introductory chemistry course designed to cover the material presented in collegiate first and second semester General Chemistry lecture and laboratory courses. Students will gain insight into the molecular world through technologically advanced lectures, interactive activities, and exciting laboratory experiments. Laboratory experiments will be conducted using state of the art Vernier LabQuest data collectors that transmit student work wirelessly to their iPads. The textbook will also be available via the innovative interactive Pearson Education iPad application. A secondary goal of this course is to provide students with a rigorous study of all topics covered on the AP Chemistry exam.

CP Physics

In this course, students will see how scientific discovery in physics is verifying the truth of God’s word. We will cover mechanics (motion, forces, Newton’s laws, energy, and momentum), orbital mechanics, kinetic theory, fluid forces, thermodynamics, wave mechanics (including sound and light), electricity, magnetism, atomic physics, and the basics of quantum physics and relativity. We will learn about real life applications of all of these topics, from household chores to sports competition, ways to build structures and vehicles, energy conservation, aircraft testing, spaceflight, and understanding the universe as a whole. Through inquiry based labs students will practice scientific processes and further develop their critical thinking skills.

CP Anatomy and Physiology

The overall goal of this course is to allow students to develop an understanding of the complexity of the human body. Through the study of the different systems of the body, the students will see how only a Creator, Jesus Christ, could make our bodies function so efficiently. In-depth knowledge of some anatomical and biological concepts will be explored in more detail. Inquiry based labs will be performed to allow students to apply their knowledge of anatomical/biological concepts and to develop critical thinking skills. All the information in this course will be taught from the Christian’s worldview with God as the Creator.

AP Biology

AP Biology is designed to offer students a solid foundation in introductory college-level biology. By structuring the course around the four big ideas, enduring understandings, and science practices, students will develop an appreciation for the study of life and help them identify and understand unifying principles within a diversified biological world. Much of what we know today about biology is a result of inquiry. Science is a way of knowing. Therefore, the process of inquiry in science and developing critical thinking skills is the most important part of this course. A secondary goal of this course is to provide students with a rigorous study of all topics covered on the AP Biology exam.

Social Studies

CP Ancient World History

The overall goal of this course is to introduce students to the study of the history of mankind from our beginnings until the 1600s. Various teaching and testing styles will be used in an effort to teach students to think critically about our origins and to discover how lessons from our history can make us more informed about our present.

Honors Ancient World History

This course will cover the same content that is taught in CP Ancient World History. This course will move at a more rapid pace and in greater detail in order to provide a more academically rigorous experience for those students with higher ability and aptitude levels in history. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Eighth Grade History, to qualify for this course.

CP Modern World History

This course is designed to provide an introductory understanding and interpretation of facts and events of World History from the period of Louis XIV (1600) to the present. The course will utilize a number of different types of teaching and testing techniques to enhance learning, critical thinking, writing, communication skills, study habits, and organization.

AP European History

This course traces European history from the Renaissance (1450) up to present day. All areas of history are covered including political and diplomatic, social and economic, and intellectual and cultural history. In addition to learning the primary historical facts and understanding the major movements in the development of world civilization, students will focus on the rise and fall of nationalities and how these ethnic groups have cooperated and fought over land, religion, and political ideas. Students will learn to assess historical materials and be able to interpret the importance of these materials as they relate to historical understanding and analysis. A secondary goal of this course is to provide students with a rigorous study of all topics covered on the AP European Exam. Students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in the prerequisite course, Ancient World History, to qualify for this course.

CP American History

This course is designed to provide a typical secondary school survey of United States History. In addition to factual content mastery, students will be required to demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills by describing significant events in American History and how they are reviewed through the prism of time (historiography).

AP United States History

This course of study is designed to provide a typical college level survey course in United States History. In addition to factual content mastery, students will be required to demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills by authoring technically sound critical writing essays in response to document-based and free response questions. A secondary goal of this course is to provide students with a rigorous study of all topics covered on the AP United States History Exam. To qualify for this course, students must earn a final grade of 88 or above in one of the prerequisite courses, AP European History or Modern World History.

Dual Enrollment Hi 201

This rigorous, college-level course is designed to be a survey of the foundation and growth of the American nation from the age of discovery through 1877. This course is designed to make students more aware of the development of our nation through the study of the past. Since this is a survey course, we will, through lectures, class discussions, and assigned readings, focus on key ideas and broad themes from the time of discovery through Reconstruction. In addition to factual content mastery, students will be expected to demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills by authoring technically sound critical writing essays and engaging in class discussions.  

Dual Enrollment Hi 202

This rigorous, college-level course is designed to be a survey of the development and expansion of the United States from Reconstruction through the modern era. This course is designed to make students more aware of the growth of our nation through the study of the past. Since this is a survey course, we will, through lectures, class discussions, and assigned readings, focus on key ideas and broad themes from the late nineteenth century. In addition to factual content mastery, students will be expected to demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills by authoring technically sound critical writing essays and engaging in class discussions.  

Government (1 semester)

This course is based on the study of concepts, ideas, and events surrounding the formation of the government of the United States. The study of political science will help students understand how citizens can become effective people in a secular world. By understanding our nation’s system of government and political parties, we can be intelligent voters, advocates for policies based upon truth, and “biblically responsible” citizens. We will see the wisdom in the doctrine of the separation of powers and be able to correctly understand the Constitution including its foundation and interpretation. We desire for our students, as young adults, to become knowledgeable, effective citizens in a lost world.

Economics (1 semester)

The economics course is a survey of basic micro and macroeconomic concepts and their application in our everyday life. This class will attempt to understand basic micro and macroeconomic concepts, the development of the science of economics, and the utilization of economics. Students will investigate the role of economic principles in relation to individual lives and the world in general - from the local movie theater to current international events - and will apply economic principles using integrated online learning resources that provide flexibility for various learning styles and links to current events.

Other Required Courses

Physical Education and Health

This is a participation-based course designed to teach the students about physical fitness. Various sports and skills will be taught that can be used as a means to provide physical activity in their daily lives throughout their lifetime. Each unit will last approximately four weeks and will cover such things as history, terminology, rules, and skills. In addition to the physical education component of this course, students will gain a conceptual understanding of the issues associated with maintaining good personal health and how they serve their greater community through the practice of health-enhancing behaviors that promote wellness throughout life.

Speech

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussions.

Fine Arts and Electives

Advanced Band

The overall goal of this course is to enable students to develop their God-given musical talent and ability, and share that gift with others through performances for our school and our community. Students will learn proper performance techniques for their instrument, fundamentals of music theory, music notation and rhythm reading, and will be exposed to a variety of performance styles and ensemble settings. Students will perform in four school concerts, all home football games, and selected away football games. Students have the option to audition for the PACS Jazz Band, college and university honor bands, and GMEA district and state events.

Performing Arts

The overall goal of this course is to allow students to develop an understanding of creativity that comes from God, and apply it to the performing arts. Students will learn proper vocal technique, and study music history, theory, and cultures through the singing of a variety of choral literature in solo, small, and large ensemble settings. Building on the fundamental skills of acting, students will develop theatrical tools in interpretation, scene development, improvisation, and characterization. Students will perform in school concerts, and may participate in school productions, trips to locations such as Disney World and New York City as well as district and statewide choral and drama events.

Honors Performing Arts

This course will cover the same content in Performing Arts except students will cover it more rapidly and in greater depth providing a more rigorous and complex experience for those students with higher ability and aptitude levels in performing arts. Students will also perform in school concerts, and may participate in school productions, trips to locations such as Disney World and New York City, as well as district and statewide choral and drama events and additional venues as required.

Technical Theatre

The overall goal of this course is to allow students to develop an understanding of technical aspects of theatre production. Students will work with elements of stage design, scenic design, sound engineering, video production, lighting design, and costume design. Students will also explore the development of theatrical design and technique throughout history.

Praise Team

This course is designed to provide an understanding of music and worship in the local church and para-church ministries while providing an overview of a professional worship leader’s responsibility to the evangelical church. Emphasis is given to the reasons for studying worship, the impact of old and new testament worship; the relationship between music and worship; the principles for Biblical worship; the tasks of teaching and training worshipers; congregational worship leading; principles of evangelism through worship; and, the use of worship in promoting the mission and purpose of the local church.

Intro to Art

High school Intro to Arts focuses on the elements of art through a variety of art techniques and media.  Students will experience art history and art appreciation while creating finished art works.  

Drawing

High School Drawing focuses on the elements of art through a variety of drawing media and techniques such as charcoal, graphite, oil pastel, and color pencil.

Printmaking

High School Printmaking focuses on the elements of art through the printmaking processes of relief and reduction linoleum printing. 

Painting

High School Painting focuses  on the elements and principles of art through a variety of painting media and techniques such as watercolor, acrylic, and encaustic.  

Pottery

High School Pottery focuses on foundational instruction in a variety of pottery building and surface design techniques such as coil, slab, and throwing on the pottery wheel.

Honors Art

High School Honors Art builds on and perfects a variety of art, media, and techniques.  Students are able to choose their own direction while maintaining a high standard of technical and conceptual difficulty.

Barnabas (Mentoring)

The overall goal of this course is to enhance and develop the community between lower and upper school students thus increasing unity among the body of Christ at our school. This course will provide a platform for students who are sophomores, juniors, or seniors to learn about service while helping to mentor younger students. This is an opportunity for students to work one on one with younger students to see if the Lord is calling them to an area of service that involves teaching or mentoring children. The course is called Barnabas, which is translated as “son of encouragement.”

College Psychology PY 210 (Dual Enrollment – 1 semester)

This course is designed to introduce the principles, methods, and areas of research within the scientific discipline of psychology. Topics covered are research methods, learning, memory, perception, physiology and mental disorders. Emphasis is on the fundamental principles and theoretical bases underlying psychology. This course is available to juniors and seniors with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing (1 semester)

This course introduces the student to the major segments of the Sports and Entertainment Industry and the social and economic impact it has on the local, state, national, and global economies. The products and services offered to consumers and the impact of marketing on these products and services are examined. Units include: Business Fundamentals, Product Mix, Product Knowledge, Product/Service Management, Business Regulations, Interpersonal Skills, Selling, Marketing-Information Management, Economics, Distribution, Pricing, Advertising, Publicity/Public Relations, Sales Promotion, Business Risks, and Organization.

Yearbook (2 semesters- yearlong course)

Yearbook students will gain skills in one or more of the following areas: page design, advanced publishing techniques, copy writing, editing and photography while producing a creative, innovative yearbook which records school memories and events. There is an emphasis on journalism skills in this class! Participants gain useful, real world skills in time management, marketing, teamwork, and design principles.

Professional Life Skills

Professional Life Skills will enable students to make informed decisions that prepare them to engage as active citizens in a dynamic global society and to successfully meet the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century global workplace. 

P21-Preparing Prince Students for the 21st Century

P21 will provide students with computer skills and technological knowledge to meet the current demands of high school and to face rigorous higher education coursework, career challenges, and a globally competitive work force.

Strength and Conditioning (1 or 2 semesters)

The overall goal of this course is to allow students to develop an understanding of the complexity of the human body and how strength and conditioning can serve to maintain this body throughout their lives. Through the study and implementation of strength and conditioning plans the students will see how only our Creator, Jesus Christ, could make our bodies function so efficiently. In-depth knowledge of different programs and exercises should form a basis for a lifetime of fitness through strength and conditioning.

Teacher Intern (1 or 2 semesters)

Teacher interns work directly with a faculty member and are exposed to a variety of teacher functions and activities. Tasks will vary from general clerical support to assisting the teacher in preparing materials and supplies in advance of lessons, creating bulletin boards, grading papers, and other activities as the teacher requires. Student interns must display a cooperative attitude and welcome the opportunity to work closely with a teacher in a classroom environment.

Office Intern (1 or 2 semesters)

Office interns work directly with staff members in support of the day-to-day administrative functions of the school. Students must be able to demonstrate excellent interpersonal communication skills and present a neat personal appearance as representatives of the of the school’s administrative team. Tasks will vary from general clerical support to escorting parents and visitors around campus. Student Office Interns must display a cooperative attitude and welcome the opportunity to work closely with staff members in an office environment.

Library Intern (1 or 2 semesters)

Library interns work directly with the Media Center Director in support of the day-to-day functions of the Media Center. There will be a variety of tasks to be completed daily. These tasks might include: recovering the library at the end of the class period, shelving books, helping to put up bulletin boards, maintaining the reading shelves, helping with book fairs and working with inventory at the end of each year. Students should arrive on time and sign in on the clipboard, complete tasks in a timely manner, follow library rules and maintain a Christ-like attitude.